ON OUR SELECTION NEWS’ CAPTURES THE ETHOS OF THE ‘FELTON FOOD FESTIVAL

ON OUR SELECTION NEWS’ CAPTURES THE ETHOS OF THE ‘FELTON FOOD FESTIVAL

Felton Food Festival organisers adamant that festival will get better, not bigger

After being blown away by the success of the Felton Food Festival last month, organisers are determined not to milk the popularity of the festival for all it’s worth and stick to the original goals.

The event’s popularity could provide a platform to expand the festival to reap a larger profit, however organisers are focusing on quality, not quantity in next year’s festival.

Organiser Sally McCreath said that focus will remain on local produce.

“We don’t want it to get bigger, we want it to get better,” Mrs McCreath said.  ”It’s not going to turn into a craft fair – it will always be about food and farming and showing people where their food comes from.”

“We want to link producers directly with consumers, and the main aim is for consumers to learn where their food comes from.  We want to get outsiders from the region to come and see how their food is grown.”

Mrs McCreath said that a focus on farming gives festival goers valuable insight into the world of agriculture, with grain workshops being particularly interesting for festival goers.

“We have samples of crops and we show what that produce can be turned into,” she said.

“Some people don’t know what goes into their cornflakes or what certain grains are used for.  The children can learn where their food comes from, and what puts value in the produce that people work to grow.  It is good for the younger generation in that it shows that there are great futures in agriculture and horticulture.”

With around 10,000 guests and 60 stall holders coming to Felton on Sunday, April 27, the festival is a mecca for business opportunities.

Mrs McCreath said the hope was to foster business relationships to allow farmers to connect with customers.  “There is a big market for fresh produce,” she said.

“While much of their produce is sold to large contactors, a small portion could be sold directly to consumers.  Because that means that the product might be harvested one day and is in customers’ cupboards the next day.  There’s no sitting on the supermarket shelves.  It may cost a little more, but they end up with a better product that lasts longer and tastes better.  It will encourage visitors to source their food locally.”

New producers are welcome to become involved with the festival next year, with a generous limit of a 200Km radius of Felton imposed on producers to be considered “local”.